Dixie Salazar
Fresno, California

Dixie is a writer of poetry and fiction, and her imaginative narratives come to life in her energetic paintings. The imagery in Dixie’s work unites characters, themes, and settings in a unique and sometimes surprising manner. Multiple yet simultaneous storylines and time periods converge in these jovial paintings. Dixie’s work has a vibrant patchwork quality shaped by her fascination with collage and found materials. The strong influence of Pierre Bonnard, one of Dixie’s favorite artists, also has a visible impact on her stylistic choices. Articulating patterns and surfaces with dream-like layers, Dixie conveys movement, feeling, and time in her eclectic work.

Heart Rock Central Coast
24" x 18" , oil painting
$1,325

Carmen on Cobalt
26" x 30" , oil painting
$1,250

Gauguin's Women in Cayucos
44" x 44" , oil painting
$2,875


Ocean Breezes
20" x 16" , oil painting
$925

In the Frozen Light of Dusk
24" x 24" , oil painting
$1,100

Discover Original Art by Dixie Salazar | Eating Caricoles oil painting | Art for Sale Online at UGallery
CURATOR PICK

Eating Caricoles
26" x 26" , oil painting
$1,150


Sisters
36" x 28" , oil painting
$1,400

Tears of the Owl Enter the Mermaid's Song
24" x 28" , oil painting
$1,575

Wine Country
22" x 26" , oil painting
$1,025


Baby Grand by the Sea
36" x 36" , oil painting
$1,750

Picasso's Women in Barcelona
28" x 24" , oil painting
$975

Mediterranean Still Life
24" x 28" , oil painting
$875


Bird on the Edge of Sleep
26" x 22" , mixed media artwork
$875

Sleeping on Mother's Quilts
28" x 28" , oil painting
$1,050

Charlie's Blues
24" x 28" , oil painting
$1,025


Victoria's Angel with a Red Shoe
36" x 24" , oil painting
$1,250

Woman in a Spanish Shawl #1
36" x 30" , oil painting
$2,200

Vintage Memories
28" x 24" , oil painting
$900


Pears by the Lake
26" x 30" , oil painting
$975


Speak with Dixie


commentsCharlie's Blues
A Vera-Angel 10/4/2017 | 10:57 AM

My father's mom was from Oaxaca. She moved as a child to Veracruz living there for the remainder of her life. It is a magical place, the sights, the sounds, the color, the food and the smells. Am sure living through the quake was frightening, glad you are back home. Adele

Dixie Salazar 9/22/2017 | 2:05 AM

Hi Adele, I'm so glad the painting arrived and that you like it. That is very gratifying to me, to know that someone appreciates all that went into the work. I was in Oaxaca the past week, so was unable to respond. I experienced the earthquake which was pretty unsettling. But just being there is so magical. I get inspired every time., so maybe there will be some new work to come out of this. Thanks for your comments.

commentsCharlie's Blues
A Vera-Angel 9/18/2017 | 11:13 AM

Dixie, the painting arrived. It is so much more beautiful than it's photograph. The colors are vibrant and the detail is extraordinary. We are so thrilled.

commentsOcean Breezes
A Vera-Angel 9/12/2017 | 6:08 PM

Dear Dixie - it is odd corresponding through a blog. My email is averaangel@leggmason.com. Thank you for sharing the story behind Sisters and Charlie's Blues. I cannot imagine life without books, art, music or literature. I believe they help us to continue to explore and redefine ourselves throughout our lives. My dad use to say through the creative arts, the hand of God was obvious. Do keep in touch. Adele

Dixie Salazar 9/11/2017 | 6:10 PM

HI Adele, It feels odd to be corresponding through a blog, but I'm glad to hear from you. How lucky you were to have the background that you did. I loved New York's diversity and got to know the doorman at my building who was Dominican and went to his daughter's quincenera, (sp.) a fond memory. "Sisters" also has a bit of family history behind it. I found out in my thirties that I had a half sister I had never been told about ( one of many family secrets I would discover eventually). Unfortunately, I was never to meet her, but I have paintings for her and also poems. Some of my work seems to be an avenue for me to work out issues from my life. I worked as an art therapist once and I guess I'm still working as my own personal art therapist. "Charlie'e Blues" is a tribute painting to one of my heroes of the blues, Charlie Musslewhite. I've met him several times and he is a true gentleman as well as a genius. I just thought you might like to know a bit more about the paintings. Thanks for contacting, Dixie

commentsCharlie's Blues
A Vera-Angel 9/11/2017 | 4:50 PM

Dear Dixie, I did not get your email, but did come back to Ugallery to check for a response and happily found one. I ws very fortunate to have a mother and her sisters who were smart, assertive women. No shrinking violets at our home. Our darling dad treated his three girls the same as his two boys. Both of our artistic slightly eccentric and politically active parents taught us to always stand up for ourselves and to never settle or expect inferior treatment because of our Hispanic background. The focused on sharing the arts, music, literature, history and tributes of their two different backgrounds. My mother was from Puerto Rico while our dad was from Mexico. We five were all born in New York, in Hell's Kitchen. We attended Catholic schools because it was the best education our parents could afford but we were taught that faith, not organized religion was what mattered. I do love your art and have am keeping an eye on Sisters and Charlie's Blues. Best, Adele

commentsCharlie's Blues
A Vera-Angel 9/11/2017 | 4:42 PM

Dear Dixie

Dixie Salazar 9/7/2017 | 4:47 PM

Thanks so much for your interest in my work and I'm so glad you appreciate the painting. I sent you an email also but was told I need to respond through the blog. I don't know if you got the email, but I wanted to add a bit more. Victoria was one of my favorite aunts and though I didn't know her well, I am still inspired by her and her story. I was brought up to be unassertive and unquestioning of authority. Thank goodness for a few examples like Victoria who was vibrant and full of life. I remember saying to myself when I was young (when I saw older ladies who looked old and worn out with old lady clothes) I won't be like that when I get older, and I think I've managed to succeed. The irony is that I collect vintage shoes and clothing that some of those "older" ladies might have worn. Now it's a fashion statement! I'm very pleased to know the painting will have a home in New York, a city that I love! I lived there for two years when I went to grad school at Columbia. Best regards, Dixie

commentsVictoria's Angel with a Red Shoe
A Vera-Angel 9/6/2017 | 2:32 PM

Dear Ms. Salazar, For many years my husband and I have spoken of buying original art. I have several pieces created by my sister, but wanted to add works from other artists. I also wanted something that would incorporate our varied Hispanic cultures as well as have a feminine voice. Quite by accident I came across UGallery and started scrolling through. Then I saw Vitoria's Angel with a Red Shoe. It seems odd, but it spoke to something within me. It reminded me of my Godmother/Aunt Margo. A force of nature who lived life to the fullest, held fast to her faith in God while at the same time having a heavy dose of suspicion against organized religion. Then I read the story behind the painting. So sad that at the point in her life when she probably needed her church and her husband beside her, she was forced to make such a gut wrenching decision. To be the angel is sad not only for Victoria but for every person who has had to live a lie or give up on personal happiness because of the rules made by man in the name of God. I love the painting and am buying it for our NYC apartment today. Sincerely, Adele Vera-Ange

Dixie Salazar 7/4/2017 | 7:44 PM

I have not blogged here before, but I'm recently in the throes of an artistic resurgence that has come about after the passing of my husband earlier this year. At first I didn't think I'd want to paint ever again or write or do much of anything. But I'm now finding the work a haven and a refuge from almost constant sadness and heartache. It is not just escape, although I suppose that element is there, but more importantly it has become a way to express some at times inexpressible feelings. I now have ten poems for Jon and three paintings. Part of me says, how can you make art out of this tragedy? But, I don't know how to turn off this wellspring of emotions that flow through me and land on the page and the canvas. Art has always been part of the fiber of my being and has seen me though many difficult times, but this is somehow different. Maybe because I am now different... I'm not sure just how, but I know that I'm now traveling on a different path and as I wander through this frightening new landscape, I need to hold onto anything I can that feels familiar and true.